Why I choose Sidi Boots

I’ve worn a whole lot boots over the years. Early Sidi, FOX, AXO, JT, Alpinestars, Gaerne and learned a lot of what my needs are in picking a pair moto boots. I ride on average of 3-4 hrs a week a year and my needs start with comfort, protection and overall wear in that order.

 My 3 pair of Sidi boots that all needed soles

My 3 pair of Sidi boots that all needed soles

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In the late 90’s and early 2000’s I wore Sidi boots and really like them for support and safety but the replacement part screws around the calf would come loose and scratch my bike up pretty bad and I ended going to FOX boots shortly after. In 2015 I was re introduced to the SIDI brand after wearing Alpinestars for over 7 years and was a little skeptical at first because the boot wasn’t popular amongst the MX community. After doing more research about the boot and how it’s quality control is like not other boot due to the fact that all the boots are made in the same Italian Factory and not sub contracted out to other Factory’s in the world to maintain the highest level of quality control.

No denying the technology that goes into Sidi boots

 replacement sole screws 

replacement sole screws 

The Sidi Crossfire 2 and 3 SRS sole have a very distinct look and features that separates them from other high end boots. The Adjustable calf, hinged ankle and painless buckles, and integrated steel toe are some great performance attributes to say the least, but the best feature is that you can customize and replace all major wear areas so when your boots wear you can replace the worn out parts with out having to replace a entire boot that is in good shape in other areas. With the particular 3 boots in the photos I am replacing the soles of my Crossfire 3’s and my last pair of Crossfire 2’s. I have already replaced a few parts on the insides of my right boot from my exhaust melting it which was nice because that’s all that was worn.

 Using sonic tools makes life easier 

Using sonic tools makes life easier 

I almost waited a tad to long to change the soles in my boots because it could have damaged the bottom of the boot wear the sole is screwed into. If you wait to long and damage that you were just not paying good enough attention to the wear areas. The other negative to waiting to long to changing the soles is it makes it really hard to get the screws out. The screw is a half turn flat head that comes out with ease as long as you don’t wear it flat. A few of mine were worn flat so once I pulled the others out I pulled the worn sole over the screw and the used pliers to take them out. When it come to the tools to change the soles you will need a flat head, screw driver, channel clock and needle nose pliers. I didn’t have a pick, but if you do it would be good to have one to clean out the screws that have dirt logged in them.

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As you can see in the above picture the Crossfire 2’s have a lot more screws and a larger replaceable sole compared to the to the newer 3’s which makes changing them much faster. The first crossfire 3 sole I replaced took me a little longer then expected because it has a certain way to go in, but once I got it dialed it was much quicker then the first one. It took me about 45 minutes to do three pairs of boots and I made sure to save any good screws that were left over so I can change them out for worn out ones in the future.

These boots are all over 1 year old and with lots of time on them, but they were not ready to go in the trash. With a investment of $35 a sole I was able to resole my boots myself and can put another year on my boots with any issues. These boots retail for $595.00 from Motonationwhich is still at the higher end of the Motocross boot market but I can assure you that you can invest about $40 a year into your boots and never need a new pair again.

 

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It’s nice to see that I can still ride on the balls of my feet